Punctuation matters: See how novels look without words

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It’s an author’s words, rather than their punctuation, that we think of as defining their style. But as Adam J. Calhoun found out this week, the periods, colons, semicolons, and commas a writer uses can have just as much impact on their output as their choice of language. In a Medium post, Calhoun stripped the words out of some of his favorite books, leaving them as streams of pure punctuation. The results showed a stark contrast between the way authors use the tools in their texts, with some exhibiting a preference for dialogue, some using commas and semicolons to construct breathless sentences, and some making almost exclusive use of the most common marks to tell their stories.

Via The Verge

Hermann Zapf Dies at 96

Hermann Zapf, the designer of fonts such as Palatino, Optima, Zapfino, Melior, Aldus, and the bizarre but much beloved Zapf Dingbats, has died at age 96. The revered German typographer and calligrapher passed away on June 4. In his long and prolific career, Zapf worked on many fonts, but his personal favorite was the humanist sans serif typeface Optima, the lettering chosen for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial wall in Washington, DC.

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From grotesque to quirky: a history of Berlin told through U-Bahn typography

The quirky station signs at Berlin’s 81 listed subway stations are as easy to overlook on a first visit as they are hard to ignore once one has developed an eye for them. Each font spells out its own history of the city. If the U8’s avant-garde modernism seems a good fit for the graphic designers and fashionistas that now frequent the line on their way to trendy Neukölln, other station signs still hark back to the capital’s authoritarian past.

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