You can’t judge a book by its cover – if you’re a robot

 

Back in September, a report suggested that robots will have eliminated 6% of jobs in the US by 2021. Fortunately for book designers, it doesn’t look as if androids are about to take over cover design any time soon. MIT Technology Review points us towards a new machine-vision algorithm dreamed up by academics at Kyushu University in Japan. In a new paper, Brian Kenji Iwana and Seiichi Uchida explain how they trained a deep neural network “to predict the genre of a book based on the visual clues provided by its cover”.

Read the full story here

You can’t judge a book by its cover – if you’re a robot

 

Back in September, a report suggested that robots will have eliminated 6% of jobs in the US by 2021. Fortunately for book designers, it doesn’t look as if androids are about to take over cover design any time soon. MIT Technology Review points us towards a new machine-vision algorithm dreamed up by academics at Kyushu University in Japan. In a new paper, Brian Kenji Iwana and Seiichi Uchida explain how they trained a deep neural network “to predict the genre of a book based on the visual clues provided by its cover”.

Read the full story here

You can’t judge a book by its cover – if you’re a robot

 

Back in September, a report suggested that robots will have eliminated 6% of jobs in the US by 2021. Fortunately for book designers, it doesn’t look as if androids are about to take over cover design any time soon. MIT Technology Review points us towards a new machine-vision algorithm dreamed up by academics at Kyushu University in Japan. In a new paper, Brian Kenji Iwana and Seiichi Uchida explain how they trained a deep neural network “to predict the genre of a book based on the visual clues provided by its cover”.

Read the full story here

You can’t judge a book by its cover – if you’re a robot

 

Back in September, a report suggested that robots will have eliminated 6% of jobs in the US by 2021. Fortunately for book designers, it doesn’t look as if androids are about to take over cover design any time soon. MIT Technology Review points us towards a new machine-vision algorithm dreamed up by academics at Kyushu University in Japan. In a new paper, Brian Kenji Iwana and Seiichi Uchida explain how they trained a deep neural network “to predict the genre of a book based on the visual clues provided by its cover”.

Read the full story here

You can’t judge a book by its cover – if you’re a robot

 

Back in September, a report suggested that robots will have eliminated 6% of jobs in the US by 2021. Fortunately for book designers, it doesn’t look as if androids are about to take over cover design any time soon. MIT Technology Review points us towards a new machine-vision algorithm dreamed up by academics at Kyushu University in Japan. In a new paper, Brian Kenji Iwana and Seiichi Uchida explain how they trained a deep neural network “to predict the genre of a book based on the visual clues provided by its cover”.

Read the full story here

Why growing old the Silicon Valley way is a prescription for loneliness

Singapore’s old people have never had it so good: now, there’s a robot to help them keep fit and healthy. RoboCoach, their new best friend, offers both encouragement and exercise tips. Its message is unambiguous: get your exercise routines wrong – skipping them no longer seems optional – and you put extra strain on the country’s overstretched public finances. As Singapore’s minister for communication and information put it, RoboCoach “is able to ensure that old people perform the exercise routines correctly so as to get maximum benefit from their workouts”. Free advice to Singaporean authorities: why not couple RoboCoach 2.0 with a fancy wristband like Pavlok, sending an electric shock every time its users slack off and deviate from established objectives?

Read the full story here

To mourn a robotic dog is to be truly human

When a Japanese pet is ceremonially cremated, the owners return after the ashes have cooled to sift through them with special chopsticks, picking out the bones one by one and transferring them to their final resting urn. This was the strangest thing I knew about Japanese funeral rites until I discovered that Buddhist priests there now hold services for robot pets as well.

Read the full story here