Air pollution masks – fashion’s next statement?

 

Yesterday saw the launch of M90, an “urban breathing mask” created by the Swedish company Airinum and sold in more than 50 countries. Face masks are already a common sight in Asian countries, although the cheap washable cotton rectangles rarely perform well in tests. Surgical masks, the type usually worn by doctors, have tended to fare better – but are still largely ineffectual. The market for pricier, more attractive masks has been growing steadily in the past few years. Sales are not notable but Freka, a British brand, had the monopoly for a while. And rightly so, given that they tapped into the trend for minimal sportswear, almost Céline-like in design, seeking to become more of a background accessory than anything stand-out.

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Air pollution masks – fashion’s next statement?

 

Yesterday saw the launch of M90, an “urban breathing mask” created by the Swedish company Airinum and sold in more than 50 countries. Face masks are already a common sight in Asian countries, although the cheap washable cotton rectangles rarely perform well in tests. Surgical masks, the type usually worn by doctors, have tended to fare better – but are still largely ineffectual. The market for pricier, more attractive masks has been growing steadily in the past few years. Sales are not notable but Freka, a British brand, had the monopoly for a while. And rightly so, given that they tapped into the trend for minimal sportswear, almost Céline-like in design, seeking to become more of a background accessory than anything stand-out.

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Fashionable anti-pollution mask is like a breath of fresh air

Sculpted, pristine and sparking with fibre optics, this mask is certainly a breath of fresh air for wearable tech, bringing style to the problem of pollution. Recently on show at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts Fashion 4wrd exhibition, the Lumoscura mask is the idea of designer Stephanie Liu, who created the piece this year while completing her industrial design degree at the Rhode Island School of Design.

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World’s first smog filtering tower goes on tour

Co-designed by Dutch artist Daan Roosegaarde, the seven-metre high tower sucks in dirty air like a giant vacuum cleaner. Ion technology then filters it, before returning bubbles of smog-free air through the tower’s vents. It is able to clean 30,000 cubic metres of air an hour, according to Roosegaarde.

Clean air is a precious commodity. A new study has found that more than three million people die prematurely due to air pollution each year. This is projected to double by 2050 if the problem isn’t tackled.

“The smog-free tower contributes to a debate that shouldn’t be confined to politics,” says Rotterdam’s mayor, Ahmed Aboutaleb. “Air pollution is a matter that affects us all, and it requires a serious discussion. But we do need innovators like Daan Roosegaarde to start the conversation at another level.”

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Projecting crying babies onto pollution is a great way to sell air purifiers

Pollution in China is a very real, very serious problem, with around 750,000 people thought to die prematurely each year because of it, with most of these caused by air pollution, both outside and indoors. It’s a scary figure, but a Chinese firm named Xiao Zhu — that just happens to be in the business of selling air purifiers — apparently thinks it’s not scary enough. To remedy this, the company has decided to highlight the dangers of pollution by projecting images of crying children onto clouds of smoke emerging from factory towers. The resulting advertising campaign named Breathe Again looks like the debut of a Chinese David Lynch, with the huge bawling faces hanging menacingly in the night sky. Presumably, it’ll also shift a few air filters.

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