UK hospital uses VR to ease kids’ nerves before an MRI

 

Magnetic resonance imaging, most common known as an MRI for short, can be a frightening experience, especially for kids. The process involves lying down on a narrow bed, sliding into the middle of a donut-shaped machine, and being bombarded by loud banging noises as the machine goes to work. To help ease children’s nerves before their first MRI, a hospital in the United Kingdom has developed a virtual reality app for kids to watch and prepare themselves for their procedure. The Kings College Hospital in London this week launched an Android app to be used with virtual reality headsets such as the Google Cardboard. In it, kids can look around the room in 360-degree view and listen as the video explains what to expect when they check into the hospital and get taken to the imaging room.

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Inspired by nature: the thrilling new science that could transform medicine

 

This last invention has helped to cement Karp’s reputation as a rising star in the world of bioengineering. Because he doesn’t just invent cool stuff – he turns his creations into actual products. “When we look to solve problems, it’s not so we can publish papers and get pats on the back from the academic community,” said Nick Sherman, a research technician at Karp Lab. “It’s more like, ‘Is this work going to help patients? If not, how do we make it help them?’” Earlier this year, Karp’s surgical glue began a human clinical trial in Paris. It is the first of Karp’s innovations to advance this far. Unlike other surgical glues on the market, his actively repels blood, making it ideal for sealing holes in blood vessels, intestinal tissue, even bone. It is also much sturdier, meaning that surgeons could use it to fix cardiac defects without the need for open heart surgery. “This could completely transform how we perform surgery,” said Jean-Marc Alsac, the cardiovascular surgeon at the Hospital European Georges-Pompidou in Paris who is overseeing the trial.

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Inspired by nature: the thrilling new science that could transform medicine

This last invention has helped to cement Karp’s reputation as a rising star in the world of bioengineering. Because he doesn’t just invent cool stuff – he turns his creations into actual products. “When we look to solve problems, it’s not so we can publish papers and get pats on the back from the academic community,” said Nick Sherman, a research technician at Karp Lab. “It’s more like, ‘Is this work going to help patients? If not, how do we make it help them?’” Earlier this year, Karp’s surgical glue began a human clinical trial in Paris. It is the first of Karp’s innovations to advance this far. Unlike other surgical glues on the market, his actively repels blood, making it ideal for sealing holes in blood vessels, intestinal tissue, even bone. It is also much sturdier, meaning that surgeons could use it to fix cardiac defects without the need for open heart surgery. “This could completely transform how we perform surgery,” said Jean-Marc Alsac, the cardiovascular surgeon at the Hospital European Georges-Pompidou in Paris who is overseeing the trial.

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Engineering lifesaving care for premature refugee babies

“Designers are problem solvers”, says James Roberts, a graduate of Loughborough University’s product design degree. Given an open brief for his final year project, Roberts was looking for a problem to solve. The 2013 Panorama documentary Saving Syria’s Children, which highlighted he plight of premature refugee babies dying from lack of access to incubators, provided the perfect engineering challenge: “I saw a problem and it was fun to solve it. It was an obvious need.”

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Man fitted with robotic hand wired directly into his brain can ‘feel’ again

A new advanced robotic hand that is wired directly into the brain has been successfully tested, allowing paralysed man to “feel”. The hand, developed by the Applied Physics Laboratory at Johns Hopkins university, is part of a research project into advanced replacement limbs funded by the US military’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa).

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The innovators: the app that allows patients to track their illnesses

David Bedford suffers from Parkinson’s disease and can sometimes forget to take one of the five different pills he needs to keep the condition in check. Worse, when he makes half yearly visits to the hospital for a check-up, he can’t remember the details of his daily routine. Three years after he was diagnosed with the disease, he now uses a mobile phone app to remind him when to take the medication but also to act as a diary of how his illness affects him. This attention to detail means that in the his short meetings he has with his consultant every six to nine months with a consultant, a daily log is available in advance.

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The innovators: the app that allows patients to track their illnesses

David Bedford suffers from Parkinson’s disease and can sometimes forget to take one of the five different pills he needs to keep the condition in check. Worse, when he makes half yearly visits to the hospital for a check-up, he can’t remember the details of his daily routine. Three years after he was diagnosed with the disease, he now uses a mobile phone app to remind him when to take the medication but also to act as a diary of how his illness affects him. This attention to detail means that in the his short meetings he has with his consultant every six to nine months with a consultant, a daily log is available in advance.

Read the full story here