How Ghana’s top fantasy coffin artist has put the fun in funeral

 

“People celebrate death in Ghana. At a funeral, we have a passion for the person leaving us – there are a lot of people, and a lot of noise,” says Jacob, 28, who has worked with his father for eight years. Far from seeing their work as morbid, Jacob says the coffins are celebratory and reflect west African attitudes to death. “It reminds people that life continues after death, that when someone dies they will go on in the afterlife, so it is important that they go in style.”

Read the full story here

How Ghana’s top fantasy coffin artist has put the fun in funeral

 

“People celebrate death in Ghana. At a funeral, we have a passion for the person leaving us – there are a lot of people, and a lot of noise,” says Jacob, 28, who has worked with his father for eight years. Far from seeing their work as morbid, Jacob says the coffins are celebratory and reflect west African attitudes to death. “It reminds people that life continues after death, that when someone dies they will go on in the afterlife, so it is important that they go in style.”

Read the full story here

How Ghana’s top fantasy coffin artist has put the fun in funeral

 

“People celebrate death in Ghana. At a funeral, we have a passion for the person leaving us – there are a lot of people, and a lot of noise,” says Jacob, 28, who has worked with his father for eight years. Far from seeing their work as morbid, Jacob says the coffins are celebratory and reflect west African attitudes to death. “It reminds people that life continues after death, that when someone dies they will go on in the afterlife, so it is important that they go in style.”

Read the full story here

How Ghana’s top fantasy coffin artist has put the fun in funeral

 

“People celebrate death in Ghana. At a funeral, we have a passion for the person leaving us – there are a lot of people, and a lot of noise,” says Jacob, 28, who has worked with his father for eight years. Far from seeing their work as morbid, Jacob says the coffins are celebratory and reflect west African attitudes to death. “It reminds people that life continues after death, that when someone dies they will go on in the afterlife, so it is important that they go in style.”

Read the full story here

How Ghana’s top fantasy coffin artist has put the fun in funeral

 

“People celebrate death in Ghana. At a funeral, we have a passion for the person leaving us – there are a lot of people, and a lot of noise,” says Jacob, 28, who has worked with his father for eight years. Far from seeing their work as morbid, Jacob says the coffins are celebratory and reflect west African attitudes to death. “It reminds people that life continues after death, that when someone dies they will go on in the afterlife, so it is important that they go in style.”

Read the full story here

How Ghana’s top fantasy coffin artist has put the fun in funeral

 

“People celebrate death in Ghana. At a funeral, we have a passion for the person leaving us – there are a lot of people, and a lot of noise,” says Jacob, 28, who has worked with his father for eight years. Far from seeing their work as morbid, Jacob says the coffins are celebratory and reflect west African attitudes to death. “It reminds people that life continues after death, that when someone dies they will go on in the afterlife, so it is important that they go in style.”

Read the full story here

China’s funeral revolutionaries

In March 2013, something clicked: Wang would have to inter his mother eventually, and he decided that he and Xu could do it better than the hucksters and faceless bureaucrats he’d dealt with in the autumn. Wang had found his business idea, although its contours were still hazy. He had studied the Silicon Valley mode of disruptive innovation, and envisioned a clear path to considerable wealth: identify a sclerotic, backward-looking industry, and harness the sleek, subversive power of the internet to trump its services at lower costs. The bigger the industry, he thought – and the deeper its problems – the greater his potential gains. Robin Li changed the way that people in China gathered information; Jack Ma changed the way they shopped; Wang and Xu would change the way they buried their loved ones. Xu was at first baffled by the idea, but he trusted his friend’s enthusiasm, and after a week of canvassing friends, agreed to do some research.

Read the full story here

What happens to my late husband’s digital life now he’s gone?

And, these days, people die a digital death alongside their physical one, which creates a whole new world of admin that didn’t pass the radar of grieving widows 50 years ago. Those 20th-century widows would have had a box of love letters and a few hard copy photos; I have Facebook messages, professional videos on YouTube, personal videos on my iPhone, email histories, recorded Skype chats, WhatsApp conversations, text messages and digital photos – photos galore.

Read the full story here

What does it feel like to die?

One became aware of a woman up in one corner of the room beckoning to him, and the next moment he was up there, looking down at himself. He recalled hearing a voice saying: “Shock the patient, shock the patient.” And he could see a nurse and a bald-headed man wearing blue scrubs that he described as “quite a chunky fella”. The other remembered being “on the ceiling looking down” and seeing a nurse pumping his chest while a doctor was “putting something down my throat”.

Read the full story here