Michael Gove’s anti-Turner prize tweets are childishly prejudiced

 

do we think that Gove, transported back to the early years of the 19th century, would have been one of those enlightened people who championed JMW Turner, or would he, do we think, have been somewhat more likely to have been bewildered by the controversial painter’s strikingly novel looseness of form and “crude blotches”, to quote fellow artist Benjamin West?

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Michael Gove’s anti-Turner prize tweets are childishly prejudiced

 

do we think that Gove, transported back to the early years of the 19th century, would have been one of those enlightened people who championed JMW Turner, or would he, do we think, have been somewhat more likely to have been bewildered by the controversial painter’s strikingly novel looseness of form and “crude blotches”, to quote fellow artist Benjamin West?

Read the full story here

Michael Gove’s anti-Turner prize tweets are childishly prejudiced

 

do we think that Gove, transported back to the early years of the 19th century, would have been one of those enlightened people who championed JMW Turner, or would he, do we think, have been somewhat more likely to have been bewildered by the controversial painter’s strikingly novel looseness of form and “crude blotches”, to quote fellow artist Benjamin West?

Read the full story here

Michael Gove’s anti-Turner prize tweets are childishly prejudiced

 

do we think that Gove, transported back to the early years of the 19th century, would have been one of those enlightened people who championed JMW Turner, or would he, do we think, have been somewhat more likely to have been bewildered by the controversial painter’s strikingly novel looseness of form and “crude blotches”, to quote fellow artist Benjamin West?

Read the full story here

Michael Gove’s anti-Turner prize tweets are childishly prejudiced

 

do we think that Gove, transported back to the early years of the 19th century, would have been one of those enlightened people who championed JMW Turner, or would he, do we think, have been somewhat more likely to have been bewildered by the controversial painter’s strikingly novel looseness of form and “crude blotches”, to quote fellow artist Benjamin West?

Read the full story here

Graphic design legend Milton Glaser dispels a universal misunderstanding of design and art — Quartz

 

“Design is the process of going from an existing condition to a preferred one,” said the 2010 National Medal of Arts recipient. “Observe that there’s no relationship to art.” 1 This confusion is not just a matter of semantics. In businesses, schools, offices, even newspapers, design is often associated with the art department. That’s a fundamental misunderstanding of the aim of design. When art and design are confused, the designers’ domain becomes limited to style and appearance.

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Graphic design legend Milton Glaser dispels a universal misunderstanding of design and art

“Design is the process of going from an existing condition to a preferred one,” said the 2010 National Medal of Arts recipient. “Observe that there’s no relationship to art. This confusion is not just a matter of semantics. In businesses, schools, offices, even newspapers, design is often associated with the art department. That’s a fundamental misunderstanding of the aim of design. When art and design are confused, the designers’ domain becomes limited to style and appearance”.

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Ai Weiwei shuts Danish show in protest at asylum seeker law

 Ai Weiwei

“He had been watching the news during the night and wanted to react. I didn’t try to dissuade him. This is not so much about which country does more or less for refugees, it is the symbolic importance of the new law. This [kind of thing] is spreading over Europe, and we in Denmark are taking the lead in this by making this law.”

Worth noting this story broke on World Holocaust Remembrance Day. My emphasis in that quote is all the more chilling for it.

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Evelyn Dunbar: the genius in the attic

One Sunday night two years ago, Ro Dunbar was watching Antiques Roadshow when she noticed something shocking. One of the people queuing in the rain to have their antiques valued had just produced a painting by her long-dead relative Evelyn Dunbar. “This is a masterpiece,” said painting expert Rupert Maas. “It is such an extraordinary picture.” Maas was worried about how to value a work by “what is perhaps an unknown artist”. In the end, he estimated £40,000-£60,000.

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