Beauty spot or landscape blot? Computer trained to judge scenery

 

Wordsworth found it in a host of daffodils; Nan Shepherd in the nooks of the Cairngorms. For Monet it popped up all over the place, from the windmills and canals of Amsterdam, to the sailing boats of Argenteuil. What lends a scene beauty has long been left to the poets and painters to define, but that may be about to change. In a new study, researchers trained a computer to tell scenic views from blots on the landscape. One day it could help with decisions over what land to protect, and how better to design new towns and cities, the scientists claim.

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Google made a site that shows how millions of people draw the same object

Back in November, Google released artificial intelligence experiment that asks you to draw a random object and see if the neural network can identify your doodle. Quick, Draw! was eventually turned into a tool that transformed drawings into clip art based on the best results it got, helping people add a visual icon to their work without requiring any particular artistic talent. Alongside Google I/O this week, Google has now released the data it received from Quick, Draw! to show you how 15 million people drew the same set of objects. It’s a fascinating look at how humans interpret a random item, from monkeys to parachutes to phones.

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