Trunki v Kiddee: battle over children’s luggage reaches supreme court

Ewan Grist, a specialist intellectual property lawyer at law firm Bird & Bird, said the case was “likely to have profound implications in the design world, whichever way the supreme court rules”. Rob Law, founder of Magmatic, led a #ProtectYourDesign campaign on Twitter to call for a further appeal to the supreme court and promote appropriate intellectual property protection for British designers. The campaign is backed by a number of UK designers and entrepreneurs, including the Habitat founder, Sir Terence Conran, the Brompton Bikes boss, Will Butler-Adams, and the Grand Designs presenter, Kevin McCloud.

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New UK passport design features just two women

The “Creative United Kingdom” passport, unveiled by the immigration minister James Brokenshire, and highlighting the successes in innovation, architecture, art and performance, includes portraits of John Harrison, who invented the marine clock, artist John Constable, and architect Sir Giles Gilbert Scott.

There are watermarks of William Shakespeare on every page, while a page each is devoted to the works of artists Antony Gormley and Anish Kapoor and to Stephenson’s Rocket, designed by George and Robert Stephenson.

Just two women are prominently displayed: the architect Elisabeth Scott, who designed the Royal Shakespeare theatre and the Bournemouth Pier theatre; and the mathematician and daughter of poet Lord Byron, Ada Lovelace, who shares a page with Charles Babbage to mark their reputation as builders of the first computer, the Babbage Analytical Engine.

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‘Hopeful’ study of autism wins Samuel Johnson prize 2015

Most importantly, said Applebaum, the judges admired Silberman’s work “because it is powered by a strongly argued set of beliefs: that we should stop drawing sharp lines between what we assume to be ‘normal’ and ‘abnormal’, and that we should remember how much the differently-wired human brain has, can and will contribute to our world,” said Applebaum. “He has injected a hopeful note into a conversation that’s normally dominated by despair.”

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Still no flying cars? The future of transit promises something even better

According to a recent study from the UCLA’s Institute of Transportation Studies, vehicle travel has declined among millennials – individuals born roughly between the early 1980s and early 2000s – compared to previous generations. According to the study, those born in the 1990s are making 4% fewer car trips and traveling 18% fewer miles per year, on average, than members of previous generations did at the same stage in their lives. “What we’re seeing is a tremendous willingness of the younger population to really adapt to this, to use these car sharing models as a way of avoiding car ownership,” Clelland said.

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Judge Dredd’s assault on consumer culture icons finally unleashed

Episodes of the Judge Dredd strip from classic British weekly comic 2000AD that poked fun at McDonald’s, Burger King and corporate mascots such as the Michelin Man and the Jolly Green Giant are due to be reprinted after almost four decades in legal limbo. In 1978, the comic featured a long-running storyline called The Cursed Earth, in which the far-future lawman went on a road trip through an America reduced to a post-nuclear wasteland populated by grotesque mutants. Two episodes – Burger Wars and Soul Food – saw Dredd go up against characters caricaturing icons of American consumer culture.

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V&A brings Japanese craftsmanship back to life for gallery reopening

Of the 550 pieces going on display in the new gallery, more than 400 needed conservation work, a project that has taken years of work by specialists in paper, metal, ceramics, lacquer, leather and textiles, a complex project coordinated by Victor Borges, senior sculpture conservator at the V&A. The lacquer pieces needed particular care, which senior furniture conservator Dana Melcher explained was unnerving for her team, because some of it went against a fundamental principle of modern western conservation practice, that all their work should be reversible. Many of the objects still look perfect to the naked eye, but under a magnifying glass minute fragments of gold leaf, mother of pearl, and gemstones in the decoration can be seen lifting and detaching. Not only is the traditional Japanese urushi lacquer derived from highly toxic tree sap – children of the traditional craftsmen are said to have been fed tiny quantities from babyhood to develop an immunity – but once applied and cured, it is irreversible and cannot be removed without destroying the object. Unlike painted surfaces, the lacquer also only sets at a high humidity level, so the treated objects have had to go into a vapour cabinet watched over by an anxious curator. Too much humidity and the gleaming surface will dull and spoil; too low and it will never set. Each piece finished and signed off has been a great relief to the team.

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The other KKK: how the Kindred of the Kibbo Kift tried to craft a new world

Each member was an artwork: living propaganda. None of their paraphernalia was shop-bought. The handicrafts aspect of the Kindred of the Kibbo Kift (kinsmen and kinswomen were supposed to make their own clothes, their own staffs, and their own tents) went hand in hand with the determination to shun many aspects of the modern civilisation that Hargrave called “civil death”. Victorian capitalism had been smashed on the fields of Flanders. Attempts to revive it would only “destroy the human race outright”.

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