The flyaway success of the Ladybird art prank

Elia raised £5,000 through Kickstarter to publish the book, painstakingly replicating the design techniques and printing technology used in the original Ladybird books. As encouragement, she put individual pages out on social media. By the time the first edition of 1,000 books had been released, at £20 apiece, it had gone viral. Retribution was swift, […]

This new 3D printed glass looks just like pouring honey

Humans have been making glass in various forms for thousands of years, from glassblowing techniques developed by the Roman empire to the industrial methods of the 1950s, floating molten glass on huge baths of melted tin. One particularly ancient process though, in which molten glass is coiled around a solid core, has been revived with […]

How the arts can help change attitudes to blindness

When non-blind people think of blindness, they tend to think of a tragic, life-limiting condition that reduces people’s interactions with and appreciation of the world. But for me, as for many blind or partially blind people, blindness is not a tragedy; it’s simply a different way of being in the world. Sure, it can be […]

How the arts can help change attitudes to blindness

When non-blind people think of blindness, they tend to think of a tragic, life-limiting condition that reduces people’s interactions with and appreciation of the world. But for me, as for many blind or partially blind people, blindness is not a tragedy; it’s simply a different way of being in the world. Sure, it can be […]

Jonathan Jones is wrong: museum fees are an abandonment of British ideals

The free admission policy costs approximately £45m to implement. The seven million additional overseas visitors now frequenting these museums spend on average £90 per day to the benefit of the wider UK economy. So, the £315m thus generated far outstrips the cost of the policy. Wider economic analysis of national museums demonstrates that for every […]

A look back at the first computer art contests from the ’60s: bullet ricochets and sine curve portraits

In any given issue, Computers and Automation devoted equal time to the latest methods of database storage and grand questions about the future of their “great instrument,” but the Computer Art Contest was soon a regular event. A look back through old issues of the journal (available at Internet Archive) shows how the fledgling discipline […]

Mysteries of metalpoint explored in British Museum exhibition

They rank as some of the most admired drawings in the world yet many people will be blissfully unaware of how artists including Leonardo, Dürer and Raphael made them: with a metal stylus over an abrasive surface often made from carbonised bone. The mysteries of a technique called metalpoint are to be explored in an […]

The street that might win the Turner prize: how Assemble are transforming Toxteth

Most locals might still be in a state of baffled amusement that the DIY handiwork of a young London-based architecture collective, Assemble, in doing up some of the area’s empty homes has been shortlisted for the country’s most prestigious art award. But the members of Assemble are at an equal loss for words – mainly […]

The scourge of the bronze zombies: how terrible statues are ruining art

It may be time to ban artists from creating statues. They have simply lost the ability to do it. The art that once gave us Michelangelo’s David and Rodin’s Burghers of Calais has degenerated into a cynical province of second-rate hacks who are filling up city squares, railway stations and other public spaces all over […]