ASA bans Heinz Beanz’s Can Song advert for safety concerns

 

A Heinz TV advert teaching viewers how to use cans of its baked beans to drum out a song has been banned for being dangerous for children to copy. The commercial, which used the strapline “Learn the #CanSong, featured children, teenagers and adults using Heinz Beanz tins to drum out the rhythm of song. Nine viewers lodged complaints with the Advertising Standards Authority that the advert encouraged “unsafe practice”, with six believing that it could be dangerous for children to emulate.

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The secret life of a clickbait creator: lousy content, dodgy ads, demoralised staff

 

Viral content and clickbait sites are different to your classic startups. They often don’t raise any money, instead generating massive amounts of capital per day by posting other people’s kitschy videos and images while plastering them with countless ads. Instead of planning for the future and diversifying their business model, most rely heavily on Facebook and adapt only when the social media company forces their hand by changing the algorithms. The worst part about these companies, however, is the emphasis on volume of product – the content – and the lack of emphasis on the wellbeing of the producers – the writers.

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Medium lays off a third of its staff as it searches for a new business model

 

Williams soured on the ad market, he said, after coming to believe it leads directly to mindless clickbait, fake news, and other undesirable content. “It’s clear that the broken system is ad-driven media on the internet,” Williams wrote. “It simply doesn’t serve people. In fact, it’s not designed to.” (Disclosure: The Verge is ad-driven media on the internet.) What Williams didn’t say is that the online advertising market is hypercompetitive, and has been mostly sewn up by Facebook and Google. Which means Medium might not ever grow as big as its investors hoped for, no matter how many publishers it signed up.

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ASA bans Heinz Beanz’s Can Song advert for safety concerns

 

A Heinz TV advert teaching viewers how to use cans of its baked beans to drum out a song has been banned for being dangerous for children to copy. The commercial, which used the strapline “Learn the #CanSong, featured children, teenagers and adults using Heinz Beanz tins to drum out the rhythm of song. Nine viewers lodged complaints with the Advertising Standards Authority that the advert encouraged “unsafe practice”, with six believing that it could be dangerous for children to emulate.

Read the full story here

The secret life of a clickbait creator: lousy content, dodgy ads, demoralised staff

 

Viral content and clickbait sites are different to your classic startups. They often don’t raise any money, instead generating massive amounts of capital per day by posting other people’s kitschy videos and images while plastering them with countless ads. Instead of planning for the future and diversifying their business model, most rely heavily on Facebook and adapt only when the social media company forces their hand by changing the algorithms. The worst part about these companies, however, is the emphasis on volume of product – the content – and the lack of emphasis on the wellbeing of the producers – the writers.

Read the full story here

ASA bans Heinz Beanz’s Can Song advert for safety concerns

 

A Heinz TV advert teaching viewers how to use cans of its baked beans to drum out a song has been banned for being dangerous for children to copy. The commercial, which used the strapline “Learn the #CanSong, featured children, teenagers and adults using Heinz Beanz tins to drum out the rhythm of song. Nine viewers lodged complaints with the Advertising Standards Authority that the advert encouraged “unsafe practice”, with six believing that it could be dangerous for children to emulate.

Read the full story here

The secret life of a clickbait creator: lousy content, dodgy ads, demoralised staff

 

Viral content and clickbait sites are different to your classic startups. They often don’t raise any money, instead generating massive amounts of capital per day by posting other people’s kitschy videos and images while plastering them with countless ads. Instead of planning for the future and diversifying their business model, most rely heavily on Facebook and adapt only when the social media company forces their hand by changing the algorithms. The worst part about these companies, however, is the emphasis on volume of product – the content – and the lack of emphasis on the wellbeing of the producers – the writers.

Read the full story here

John Lewis unveils Christmas ad starring a dog on a trampoline

 

The retailer will employ a host of innovative social media tools to help encourage sharing and interaction as the battle for hearts and minds in the run-up to the biggest shopping period of the year becomes increasingly digital. These include a tie-up with Snapchat, which will allow UK users of the messaging app to use a Buster lens on Thursday, so they can snap portraits with comedy dog ears and nose. After that, the filter will pop up when Snapchat is used in a John Lewis store. Until Sunday 13 November, customers will be able to use special Twitter stickers that pop up when they use the hashtag #bouncebounce to personalise their photos with Buster and the other animals. Visitors to John Lewis’s Oxford Street store will be able to try a virtual reality version of the trampoline, where they can bounce alongside the animals using Oculus Rift goggles.

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ASA bans Heinz Beanz’s Can Song advert for safety concerns

 

A Heinz TV advert teaching viewers how to use cans of its baked beans to drum out a song has been banned for being dangerous for children to copy. The commercial, which used the strapline “Learn the #CanSong, featured children, teenagers and adults using Heinz Beanz tins to drum out the rhythm of song. Nine viewers lodged complaints with the Advertising Standards Authority that the advert encouraged “unsafe practice”, with six believing that it could be dangerous for children to emulate.

Read the full story here