This Adidas 3D-printed sneaker is made from ocean waste

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Adidas has teamed up with Parley for the Oceans — a movement aimed at eliminating the plastic waste that ends up in our seas — to create a new 3D-printed sneaker concept. The design consists of an upper made from “ocean plastic content” and a 3D-printed midsole made from recycled polyester and fishing nets. Adidas says the shoe “stands for how we can set new industry standards,” but unfortunately it’s just a prototype for now — don’t expect to see it in stores any time soon.

Read the full story here

The Fabric of India: Victoria and Albert Museum

Fabric of India

I took the opportunity to visit this exhibition at the V&A recently and it is really very good. A far cry from the Alexander McQueen Savage Beauty exhibition in the same rooms last summer. And yet, for all its quiet unassuming nature in many ways this is the more appealing. Less about spectacle and more about the craft of textile production, the exhibition includes several short videos showing the laborious techniques used to create the materials on display. Having said that, it is still rather spectacular.

It’s scandalously short-lived, this exhibition – it closes on 10 January 2016 so go see it now while you can.

India’s handmade textiles are embedded in every aspect of its identity. The history of these fabrics date back at least 6000 years. Courtly splendour was proclaimed by sumptuous fabrics, while religious worship still finds expression through sacred cloths. Centuries of global trade have been shaped by the export of Indian textiles and patterns, in demand around the world. These celebrated hand-made textiles even survived the threat of industrialisation, instead uniting India as symbols of power and protest. Today, young designers are adapting traditional making techniques to create exciting new fashion, art and design for a global audience, giving India’s textile history a new relevance in the modern world.

Visit the exhibition web site here