From ‘hands that do dishes’ to a bathtime Flake: the changing face of brands on TV

 

Ads like the one for Harmony hairspray in the 1970s perpetuated the idea that a woman’s main aim was to appeal to as many men as possible, as a series of potential suitors asked: “Is she, or isn’t she?” A later campaign for the deodorant Impulse showed men who “just can’t help” handing flowers to a fragrant woman. However, as commercials moved away from predictable stereotypes, many of the conventional gender roles were helpfully turned on their head.

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UK hospital uses VR to ease kids’ nerves before an MRI

 

Magnetic resonance imaging, most common known as an MRI for short, can be a frightening experience, especially for kids. The process involves lying down on a narrow bed, sliding into the middle of a donut-shaped machine, and being bombarded by loud banging noises as the machine goes to work. To help ease children’s nerves before their first MRI, a hospital in the United Kingdom has developed a virtual reality app for kids to watch and prepare themselves for their procedure. The Kings College Hospital in London this week launched an Android app to be used with virtual reality headsets such as the Google Cardboard. In it, kids can look around the room in 360-degree view and listen as the video explains what to expect when they check into the hospital and get taken to the imaging room.

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Air pollution masks – fashion’s next statement?

 

Yesterday saw the launch of M90, an “urban breathing mask” created by the Swedish company Airinum and sold in more than 50 countries. Face masks are already a common sight in Asian countries, although the cheap washable cotton rectangles rarely perform well in tests. Surgical masks, the type usually worn by doctors, have tended to fare better – but are still largely ineffectual. The market for pricier, more attractive masks has been growing steadily in the past few years. Sales are not notable but Freka, a British brand, had the monopoly for a while. And rightly so, given that they tapped into the trend for minimal sportswear, almost Céline-like in design, seeking to become more of a background accessory than anything stand-out.

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Do we still need Doctor Who? Time travel in the internet age

 

Most people, Wells wrote – “the predominant type, the type of the majority of living people” – never think about the future. Or, if they do, they regard it “as a sort of blank nonexistence upon which the advancing present will presently write events”. The more modern sort of person – “the creative, organising, or masterful type” – sees the future as our very reason for being: “Things have been, says the legal mind, and so we are here. The creative mind says we are here because things have yet to be.” Wells, of course, hoped to personify that creative, forward-looking type.

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Google is helping H&M construct a custom dress based on your personal data

 

Google is teaming up with H&M Group’s digital fashion house Ivyrevel in an attempt to make data fashionable. The two companies are working together on an Android app that’ll track wherever users go, the weather where they live, and whether they’re having casual or formal hangs. With that information, Ivyrevel will design an individualized “data dress” users can buy. How exactly will the dress visualize data? It’s not totally clear, but based off images, it seems the dress will be fitted for formal or casual occasions and then details on it will be attributed to certain things. So because it’s cold in Sweden, the dress will be made of black velvet, and because the wearer likes to go out dancing, it’ll have diamond details. I guess this kind of makes sense. You just have to have a liberal interpretation of data and be willing to use your imagination

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Net ​nostalgia: the online museums preserving dolphin gifs and spinning Comic Sans

 

Scott is interested in conserving the stuff we have forgotten has value. Increasingly, our culture plays itself out on the internet, yet even now we have a tendency to view what we do on there as trivial. Or we make the mistake of assuming that digital means for ever. “The problem is, the internet’s systems have been designed as though everything goes on indefinitely,” he says. “There are no agreed-upon shutdown procedures. When users die, what do you do? Because their accounts live on, and suddenly Facebook is telling you your dead friend also likes Snickers bars. Often, you don’t even know who’s running a site. It’s as if you didn’t know who was in charge of your water supply; then one day, it just stopped …”

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Here are Facebook’s marketing tips for exploiting lonely people

 

Facebook has some advice for brands on how to get their marketing messages to resonate with newly single people. In a blog post today, the company expounded on ways in which single people act in the wild and on the internet, as well as ways to capitalize on their sad, sad lives

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