The latest advance in 3D printing: replacement teeth

Imagine teeth that remain white and pristine over time, without all the accumulation of bacteria that cause dental problems. While the thought of having a 3D-printed tooth inside your mouth might not sound so great, is it really any worse than dealing with the constant toothache from a decaying tooth?

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Believing in weaving: a return to classic craft

“There is something different about a hand-woven piece,” says Mario Sierra, who took his family company’s helm three years ago, to relaunch its distinctive textured weaves. “The emotions of the weaver are captured in the subtle irregularities of the fabric.” In a world over-filled with machine-made objects, provenance is becoming increasingly important; we love history, heritage and the idea of buying something with a story. All of Mourne’s textiles are handmade in its remote Northern Ireland workshop; even the yarns are custom-spun for that “lumpy” quality that gives the pieces so much texture.

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Obama is right: reading is what connects us to others – even a French puffin

This week Barack Obama told novelist Marilynne Robinson that reading had taught him how to be a citizen, which was to do “with being comfortable with the notion that the world is complicated and full of greys, but there’s still truth there to be found … And the notion that it’s possible to connect with some[one] else even though they’re very different from you.”

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Philip Pullman decries ‘terrible state’ of children’s education in the arts

Children’s education in the arts is in a “terrible state” thanks to an obsession with exams and league tables, the award-winning novelist Philip Pullman has said. The author of the His Dark Materials trilogy urged the government to make theatre visits for schools “a firmly established part of the curriculum”, saying he was concerned about falling numbers of children being taken to plays and concerts.

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Website The Oatmeal trolls HuffPo over cartoons published without permission | Media | The Guardian

Having a baby is way harder than having a cat. So is asking for permission to publish a comic, it seems. On Tuesday, Huffington Post UK published a series of images from the well-known cartoon website The Oatmeal, created by Matthew Inman. The images were published without permission. When Inman discovered the post, instead of asking Huffington Post to remove the images right away, Inman replaced them with another image featuring a short message and a copy of his Amazon bill, where the images are stored.

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Wil Wheaton is right: Stop expecting artists to work for free — or worse, for “exposure”

Do artists, writers, photographers, musicians and others deserve to be compensated for their work? The debate over working for free goes back a while now. But there are still people who haven’t heard the argument and think that “exposure” of creative work is reason enough for people to give away their labors.

The cult actor Wil Wheaton – best known for his roles on “Star Trek: The Next Generation” and “Big Bang Theory” — has written a short piece that should spread the word that giving your stuff away to a wealthy company is almost never a good idea. And his Twitter rant is standing up for the rights of creatives as well.

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Police launch YouTube ad campaign comparing sexual consent to making tea

Thames Valley police has launched a YouTube campaign to raise awareness of sexual consent that uses an analogy about making tea. The campaign, Consent: It’s as Simple as Tea, runs for almost three minutes and features stick figures making, accepting or rejecting cups of tea in various situations.

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Japan urged to ban manga child abuse images

Japan must ban sexually abusive images of children in manga comics, despite claims that such a move would threaten freedom of expression, the UN’s special envoy on child protection has said. Maud de Boer-Buquicchio praised Japan for passing a law last year that banned the possession of abusive images of children, but said it contained loopholes that allowed exploitation to continue.

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Moshi Monsters in ‘name and shame’ campaign by UK ad regulator

The UK advertising regulator has begun a “name and shame” campaign against Moshi Monsters after the hugely popular children’s website failed to abide by a ruling that it must stop promoting paid subscriptions to kids. In August, the Advertising Standards Authority ruled that running ads to promote subscriptions to children was a breach of the UK code on social responsibility, as well as direct exhortation and undermining parental authority.

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