The Cinematic Portrayal of Graphic Designers in Film & Television

Pretty telling.

I think Colin from Eastenders (also known as ‘gay Colin’ because back in those days, having a gay character on TV was still somewhat cutting edge) was the first ‘graphic designer’ I’d seen represented on TV. It seemed quite cool. He had grey walls in his flat, black ash furniture everywhere, was noticeably middle class, and owned an Amstrad computer.

Curse you gay Colin.

(I jest, of course. Colin and his boyfriend Barry had the first onscreen gay kiss. Michael Cashman who played him is now Baron Cashman, a Labour Member of the European Parliament)

Fashion lessons from Star Wars: The Force Awakens

StarWarsFashion.jpg

I think this is a piss-take by Hannah Marriott for The Guardian, but you can never tell. So I’ll mostly be wearing orange and black this season

Captain Phasma’s mask is sleek – very on-trend silver coupled with a sexy off-the-shoulder cape – but the storm troopers’ monochrome styling and dark glasses are unequivocally the best.

Avoiding spoilers: 1977 v 2015

Star Wars Poster

Like a lot of people I spent quite a bit of 2015 both anticipating the new Star Wars movie and trying (successfully as it turns out) to avoid any spoilers.

And it amazes me no end, considering the times we live in, that the film makers managed to keep one of the biggest secrets away from the vast majority of us. (Obviously I won’t say what it is – even thought the film has been out for a couple of weeks, there’ll always be someone who hasn’t seen it – I still lower my voice if ever I mention the big reveal in The Empire Strikes Back).

Compare this with 1977 and the release of the movie that started it all, Star Wars (back then, no ‘Episode IV: A New Hope’ in sight).

The film was previewed at the 34th World Science Fiction Convention and here’s what attendees got to see:

An hour-long slide presentation, made up of 35mm slides of the film’s production artwork and on-set production photos, was narrated live in the Muehlebach’s Imperial Ballroon, the hotel’s largest, to a standing-room-only crowd; this was presented by Lippencott. He outlined in great detail the entire plot of the film from scene one through to the final scene.

An hour! The movie’s only about twice that… Fast forward nearly 40 years and the most you get is a few carefully edited split-second shots.